Category Archives: Industry News

Amanda Hocking: The E-book Millionaire

Another author makes it big off self-publishing. Amanda Hocking proves passion is the key ingredient to turning dreams into dollar signs. If you love writing, working a 9 to 5 won’t even stop you.

Anyone who has danced around the Indie blogosphere might have stumbled upon the novel Wake by Amanda Hocking. Well guess what, Miss. Hocking’s writing career did not begin with a seven figure contract from St. Martin’s Press. She started her writing career coming home after working late until 10 p.m., drinking a red bull, and then working eight hours straight on her writing.

Seeing she could get the same quality novels as a publisher, she self-published them online. Nine books led to a big return on investment.

Miss. Hocking inspired me. Now it is your turn. Let Miss. Hocking inspire you.

New Release: Denise Turney’s Love Pour Over Me

Denise Turney:

Denise Turney is a professional writer who brings more than thirty-two years of book, newspaper, magazine, radio and business writing to a project. She is the author of the books Portia, Love Has Many Faces, Spiral, Rosetta’s Great Adventure, Long Walk Up and Love Pour Over Me. Denise Turney is an internationally celebrated author who is listed in various entertainment and business directories, including industry leaders such as Who’s Who, 100 Most Admired African American Women and Crosswalk. Denise Turney’s works have appeared in Parade, Essence, Ebony, Madame Noire, The Pittsburgh Quarterly and Obsidian II.

Title: Love Pour Over Me

Publisher: Chistell Publishing

Release date: March 2012

Website: http://www.chistell.com

Purchase Link: http://www.chistell.com/order.php

Link to Tour on Main Site –  http://www.virtualbooktourcafe.com/3/post/2012/05/love-pour-over-me-by-denise-turney.html

A father and son’s estranged relationship threatens to destroy the son’s only chance at real love. But is a painful childhood enough to choke a young man’s promising future? Love will find and heal the most broken hearted, disappointed, abused and ashamed. Love has come. There is no turning back.

Excerpts :

EXCERPT ONE

 

Chapter One

It was Friday afternoon, June 15, 1984.  Raymond Clarke lay across his bed.  An empty bowl of popcorn was on the floor.  Snacking did little to ease his excitement.  In less than three hours his year round efforts to prove himself deserving of unwavering acclaim would be validated in front of hundreds of his classmates.  Tonight was his high school graduation, the day he had dreamed about for weeks.  He knew his grades were high enough to earn him academic honors.  Even more than his grades were his athletic achievements.  He hadn’t been beaten in a track race in three years; he won the state half mile and mile runs for the last six years, since he was in middle school.  People would cheer wildly for him tonight.

The television was turned up loud. “Carl Lewis threatens to break Bob Beamon’s historic long jump record at the Olympic Trials in Los Angeles this weekend,” an ESPN sportscaster announced.  “Beamon’s record has stood for sixteen years.  Lewis . . . “

Raymond got so caught up in the mention of the upcoming Olympic Games that he didn’t hear the front door open.

“Ray,” his father Malcolm shouted as soon as he entered the house.

“What?”  Raymond leaped off his bed and hurried into the living room.  “Dad?”

“What?  Boy, if you don’t get your junk–”

Raymond watched his father wave his hand over the sofa, the place where he’d thrown his sports bag as soon as he got home from graduation practice at school.

“Get this sports crap up,” Malcolm growled.

Silence filled the house.

Raymond grabbed his sports bag, carried it into his bedroom and tossed it across his bed.

His father exited the living room and entered the kitchen.  Like a dark shadow, frustrations from spending ten hours working at a drab automobile plant where he drilled leather seats into one Ford Mustang after another while his line supervisor stood at his shoulder and barked, “Focus, Malcolm.  Get your production up,” followed him there.  It was in the furrow of his brow and in the pinch of his lip.  “Ray.”

Raymond cursed beneath his breath before he left his bedroom and hurried into the living room.  Seconds later he stood in the kitchen’s open doorway.

He watched his father toss an envelope on the table.  “Letter from Baker came in the mail.  Something about you getting some awards when—“  He reached to the center of the kitchen table for a bottle of Steel Fervor.  He’d stopped hiding the alcohol when Raymond turned five.  The alcohol looked like liquid gold.  Felt that way to Malcolm too.  “you graduate tonight.”

Malcolm took a long swig of the whiskey and squinted against the burn.  He tried to laugh but only coughed up spleen.  “You’re probably the only kid in the whole school who got a letter like this.  Everybody up at Baker knows nobody cares about you.  Letter said they thought I’d want to let all your relatives know you’re getting some awards so they’d come out and support you.”

Again Malcolm worked at laughter, but instead coughed a dry, scratchy cough that went long and raw through his throat.  “We both know ain’t nobody going to be there but me and your sorry ass.  Don’t mean nothing anyhow.  They’re just giving these diplomas and awards away now days.”  On his way out of the kitchen, bottle in hand, he shoved the letter against Raymond’s chest.

Raymond listened to his father’s footsteps go heavy up the back stairs while he stood alone in the kitchen.  When the footsteps became a whisper, he looked down at the letter.  It was printed on good stationery, the kind Baker High School only used for special occasions.  Didn’t matter though.  Raymond took the letter and ripped it once, twice, three times — over and over again — until it was only shreds of paper, then he walked to the tall kitchen wastebasket next to the gas stove and dropped the bits inside.

“Ray.”

He froze.  From the sound of his father’s voice, he knew he was at the top of the stairs.

“Give me that letter, so I’ll remember to go to your graduation tonight.”

Raymond twisted his mouth at the foulness of the request, the absolute absurdity of it.  He didn’t answer.  Instead he turned and walked back inside his bedroom.  He grabbed his house keys and headed outside.  At the edge of the walkway, he heard his father shout, “Ray.”

Raymond didn’t turn around.  He walked down the tree lined sidewalk the way he’d learned to walk since Kindergarten – with his head down.  He stepped over raised cracks in the worn sidewalk, turned away from boarded windows of two empty dilapidated buildings and told himself the neighborhood was just like his father – old, useless, unforgiving and hard.

A second floor window back at the house went up.  Malcolm stuck his head all the way out the window.  “Get your ass back here,” he hollered down the street.

Raymond sprang to his toes and started to run.  His muscular arms and legs went back and forth through the cooling air like propellers, like they were devices he used to try to take off, leave the places in his life he wished had never been.  It was what he was good at.  All his running had earned him high honors in track and field.  He was Ohio’s top miler.  He’d made Sports Illustrated four times since middle school.

“Ray.”

“Yo, man, you better go back,” Joey chuckled as Raymond slowed to a stop.  Joey, a troubled eighteen-year-old neighbor who dropped out of school in the tenth grade, leaned across a Pontiac Sunbird waxing its hood.  “If you don’t, your old man’s gonna beat your ass good.”

“Aw, Ray’s cool,” Stanley, an equally troubled twenty-one-year-old who pissed on school and failed to get a diploma, a man who couldn’t read beyond the third grade level, said.  He stood next to Joey.  His hands were shoved to the bottoms of his pants pockets.  “And we know the Brother can run.  Damn.  We all can run,” Stanley laughed.

“Ray, remember the night we ran away from that Texaco station, our wallets all fat?” Joey laughed.  He talked so loudly, Raymond worried he’d be overheard.

“Thought we agreed to let that go,” Raymond said.  He looked hard at Joey then he looked hard at Stanley and the nine-month old deal was resealed, another secret for Raymond to keep.

One glance back at his father’s house and Raymond started running again.  He ran passed Gruder’s an old upholstery company and Truder Albright, a small, worn convenience store, all the way to the Trotwood Recreation Center six miles farther into the city.

EXCERPT TWO

It was eight o’clock.  Raymond told himself not to but he turned partway and glanced over his shoulder.  It was as if he’d suddenly been plagued with dementia, because he forgot the years of abuse heaped upon him with Malcolm’s calloused hands.  He wanted Malcolm to walk through the convention center doors sober and real proud like.  He wanted Malcolm to be glad to call him his son.

“To the students, as I call out your name, please stand and make your way onto the stage.”  Principal Jones flipped through a stack of stapled papers then he pushed his mouth close to the microphone and said slowly, “Sharon Appleseed.”

A loud round of applause, whistling and “way to gos” pierced the air.  It went on like that for more than an hour, until all but two students had received a diploma – Raymond and Janice Thompson, a bright sixteen year old who sat in a wheelchair due to spina bifida.

Principal Jones sang Janice’s praises.  Hers had been a stellar academic career right from the start.  “She’s earned her way onto the Honor Roll every year since the Seventh Grade.  She was voted to Girls State by our finest instructors.  She has won three presidential academic citations.  And,” Principal Jones laughed, “I’m sure her parents appreciate this most.  She has earned a full scholarship to Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia.”  Principal Jones’ hand went out.  “Ladies and gentlemen,” he beamed, “Please stand and congratulate the Class of 1984’s Salutatorian, Janice Thompson.”

Janice pushed the wheelchair toward the stage and everyone stood and applauded wildly.  Amid the swell of noise and the sea of people, Raymond looked over his shoulder and searched every face for Malcolm.  His gaze darted in a crazed fashion.

Then he felt a tap on his shoulder.  It was his friend, Paul.  They sat next to each other.  “Yo, Man, is your pops coming?”

Raymond turned away from Paul, faced the stage and stood tall, head up, shoulders back.

When Paul tapped him again, he jerked his shoulders hard and shrugged him off.

The auditorium grew quiet.

“And now, it’s time for us to bestow the top honor.”  Principal Jones smiled before he said, “This young man has earned high commendations academically and athletically.”

In short intervals, Paul, several members of the track team and Raymond’s high school track coach turned and looked to the back of the auditorium toward the entrance doors.  They prayed for Malcolm to show.

“Damn,” Paul muttered when he turned around and faced the stage for the eighth time.  He bumped shoulders with the guy who stood next to him.  “That asshole ain’t coming.”  He lowered his head and his voice.  “Ray’s pops ain’t coming.”

“This young man has earned All-City, All-County, All-State and top national honors in cross-country and track and field.  In fact, twice he’s been listed as the top high school miler in the country by Sports Illustrated and Track and Field News.  He has earned four Presidential academic citations.  He’s been on the Honor Roll since the Seventh Grade.”  Principal Jones scanned the auditorium for Malcolm.  When he didn’t see him, he spoke slower and started to make things up in the hopes that time would become Raymond’s friend.

“I remember when he first came to Baker.  He was a scared young man, but not anymore.”  He pursed his lips and gave Raymond a nod.  “He’s ready to take advantage of the full scholarship his achievements have gained him.”  Principal Jones glanced at the doors.

A few students and several parents squirmed in their seats.  Some people glanced at their watches as if to say “Come on”.

“He has maintained a 4.0 grade point average since the ninth grade.  He hasn’t missed a day of school since the third grade.”  The doors demanded his attention again, but no one came through them.

“Ladies and Gentlemen, please congratulate Baker High School’s Class of 1984 Valedictorian, Raymond Clarke.”

Paul clapped until his hands stung.  A few students stood in their seats and hollered out, “Go, Ray!”  Before long a chant went up.  All the students pumped their fists in the air and shouted, “Ray-mond!  Ray-mond!”

Raymond’s heart beat wildly in his chest.  He clamped his teeth down against his bottom lip and jailed the rising emotion.  He extended his hand when he neared Principal Jones’ side.

“Well done,” Principal Jones told him as he handed him his diploma.  He patted Raymond’s back.  “You did a fine job, Son.”  He shook his head,   “A fine job.”

The chain lock was on the front door when Raymond got home that night.  He jiggled the chain and tried to get it to slide open.  When that didn’t work he walked to the back of the house and tried to open the rear door, the one leading to the backyard.  He cursed as he realized a chain lock was on the back door as well.  Then he looked for an opening.  He was in luck.  The kitchen window was ajar just enough to allow him entry.  He grunted and pushed up.  The screen didn’t even bang when it landed in the sink.  He crawled through the window like a thief.

When he reached the stairs, he saw a flicker of light coming from the second floor.  “Dad,” he called out softly, then louder as he made his way up the stairs.  “Dad.”

A newly pressed blue striped suit coat hung across the chair in the corner of his father’s bedroom.  The television was turned down so low it sounded like it was humming.

“Dad?”

The bed was empty, covers bunched together near the foot.  The shade to the room’s one lamp was tilted as if someone had punched it.

“Dad?”

Raymond walked across the hall. He started to scream.  “Dad?”  He ran back down the stairs.  “Dad?” he screamed as he made his way through the house.

He saw the shadow, curled and bent like an old man, at his bed’s edge.  Silence was his escort into his own room.

Malcolm stood slowly.  His body leaned right, from his shoulders to his ankles.  His hands were clenched.  His eyes were slits.  “Why didn’t you tell me?” he demanded.  His hands, then his arms and legs quaked.  He took heavy Frankenstein-like steps toward Raymond.  “Why didn’t you tell me?  Why didn’t you tell me?”

When no more than a few inches separated them, Raymond saw the red in his father’s eyes.

Malcolm stepped forward again, and this time, Raymond stepped back.  He prepared to duck.  “Tell you what?” he stammered.  Fear had gone into his body.  He felt like, instead of blood, electricity was coursing through his veins.

“Why didn’t you tell me?”

“What?  What, Dad?” Raymond screamed.  “Tell you what?”

Also read:

https://lawreigns.com/2012/06/18/denise-turney-how-to-land-author-interviews-and-increase-sales/

Contemporary Romance The Carny by Brooke Moss

“Sweet, subtle, heart-warming romance.” –USA Today Bestselling Author, Nicola Marsh

“Brooke Moss is a gifted storyteller. With a compelling plot and characters who will steal your heart, The Carny is a winner.” — Cate Lord, author of Lucky Girl.

 

Two people from opposite worlds, one unforgettable kiss.
You can’t judge a carny by its cover.

At a town fair on the coast of Oregon, handsome Native American carny, Vincent Youngblood, bestows an unforgettable kiss on shy, awkward teenager, Charlotte Davenport. Then disappears without another word, leaving her baffled and enamored.

Ten years later, Charlotte is still living in the small fishing town of Astoria, while being trained to–reluctantly–take over for her philandering hotelier father when he retires. After all, who else will do it? Her two perfect sisters are busy being married to their flawless husbands and having cookie cutter children, while Charlotte remains single, childless, and every bit as mousy as she was a decade ago.

As Charlotte struggles to climb out from underneath her judgmental parents thumb, the carnival rolls back into town, and Charlotte finds herself face to face with Vin again. He’s back to run his father’s carnival, walking away from a promising career in medicine he started in Chicago. Will her biased and judgmental family accept her relationship with a man who is not only a Native American, but works as a carny for a living? And what unsavory secrets bind the well-educated and seemingly superlative Vin to that ramshackle carnival? After all, you can’t judge a carny by its cover.

 

Special Teaser Quote!

““I think I should kiss you.” He raised his eyebrows. “To really drive the point home.”

His lips touched mine before I could agree with him. They were soft and full, and tasted faintly of the soda pop he’d been drinking.”

 

Want to read more of the toe-curling romance of Charlotte and Vincent? – See the complete list of release day party  hosts and enjoy the sweet tid-bits!

 

EXCLUSIVE BOOK BIRTHDAY DISCOUNT!

Buy the book now at Inkspell Publishing Store and enjoy a special EXCLUSIVE 30% discount! Offer valid only till 14th July!

Oh, but if you thought Charlotte’s life was so easy before she met Vin, then you are mistaken.  Read her story “Charlotte’s Wedding” for free! Only till 10th July!

Also, available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and The Book Depository amongst others.

RWA Golden Heart Finalist Valerie Bowman: No one said it would be easy

Valerie Bowman, a 2011 Romance Writers of America Golden Heart Finalist, will reveal her path to publishing her debut novel Secrets Of A Wedding Night this Saturday, June 30.

The New York Times Bestselling Author Lisa Kleypas described the novel as being “the most charming and clever debut I’ve read in years.”

Sadly, Secrets Of A Wedding Night is not to be released until Sept. 25, which probably means it is in the early stages of promotion.  Looking on the positive side, for all you reviewers out there you can hit up NetGalley to see if you can score a review copy from St. Martin’s Press.

For everyone else, we get to ease the anticipation by asking ourselves how did Miss. Bowman reach such success?

Well for one she did not rush the process.

Starting the draft of her debut novel July 2010, during the creative process of creating the draft, she spent ample amount of time conducting the necessary research to create a believable world.

Miss. Bowman will describe more about her writing process, but I am warning you, it is structured. Having plot, characterization, and GMC is a must before she ever places pen to paper or finger to keyboard.

Just to give you a quick lesson, GMC stands for goals, motivation, and conflict. It requires the author to answer some questions for each of the main characters such as: what do they want, what is keeping them from getting it, and why? By the end of the analysis process, one has a chart.

Such research can take several days, but as Miss. Bowman will disclose in her Saturday Interview, no one said it would be easy. Come back to see what keeps her motivated to achieve success in the publishing industry this Saturday.

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New release: Wings of Hope

Title: Wings of Hope

Author: Hillary Peak

Genre: Literary Fiction

The letter said he was dying, that’s all Jules Weinstein knows when she leaves her life in San Francisco and moves to New York City to be with her father.  She goes for the remarkable opportunity to really know her father. She never dreamed he had liberated a concentration camp, dealt cards to Bugsy Siegel or saved the life of a Black Panther. Wings of Hope is a road trip through the memories of a man making peace with his life.  Little does she know that by getting to know her father, she will find herself.  While her father struggles with whether his life was meaningful, Jules discovers that her father’s last gift to her is the ability to reach for her dreams.  Her journey teaches her that “the goodbye” is sometimes the most heartbreakingly beautiful part of life.

Author Bio

Hillary Peak is a recovering idealist. She became a lawyer to change the world and is still somewhat shocked that didn’t occur. Now, her goal is to retire from practicing law and write novels that people love. She is currently a practicing attorney in the District of Columbia. She lives with her family in Alexandria, VA.

Links


Book Excerpts

Excerpt 1:

Gingerly, without spilling my tea or setting it down, I reached over and pulled the envelope from the stack.  I tried to open it without letting go of my tea, but that proved impossible.  Setting the tea down, I ran my finger along the edge and pulled out the letter within.

Daughter, I’ve had some bad news–it seems I have an inoperable brain tumor.  I’ve been seeing six specialists.  They all had the same thing to say, “You’re dying.”  So, it seems I’m dying.  They are saying I have three months to live.

This is hard for me to ask, but I would like you to come and stay with me to the end.  There are things I’ve always wanted to tell, but never got around to it.  Seems if I don’t do it now, I’m never going to have the chance.   I’ve spent a lifetime trying to make my mark on the world, but as I look back now, I missed out on you.

I know it is a lot to ask, but please, come.

Love, Dad

My hands began to tremble; my chest tightened.  Dying?  That couldn’t be right.

Excerpt 2:

As we sat at the table sipping coffee, I ventured my first question, “Dad, what were your parents like?  You haven’t told me much about them, except that your mother had more brains in her pinkie than you’ve ever had.”  I worried I wouldn’t have time to find out all I wanted to know.

He looked up, surprised.  “Haven’t I told you about them?”

I shook my head.  “But I’d really like to know more about them–especially what they were like.”

A smile spread across his face, “Really?  I can’t believe that.  My mother would have loved you–eaten you with a spoon.  Remember when I took you to Fiddler on the Roof?”

I nodded, not wanting to break the spell by speaking.

“You were horrified that Golda hadn’t even met Tevya before they were married?”

I nodded again.  That had horrified me, I couldn’t imagine not falling in love, courting, all that comes with the fun of meeting someone special, dressing up to go out, etc.  The coffee mug warmed my hands, as I listened enraptured.

“Well, my parents were married like that.”

Rather than actually seeing it, I felt my jaw hit the floor.  “You’re kidding!”  I exclaimed without thinking.

“Nope.”  He shook his head, watching me with amusement.“They’d never even seen one another.  Married in a little village in Poland called Tarnapole.  It is gone now–burned to the ground by the Nazis, I think.”  His eyes misted over, but continued anyway.  “My mother got pregnant with your Aunt Rebecca almost immediately.  My dad was a barrel maker–and a fine woodworker.  He made furniture for people as well.  Six months after Rebecca was born, my mother got pregnant again–with Aunt Rachel.  The pogroms went on at that time, and getting worse every day from what I gathered from my parents.  Money and food were running out.  It was quite desperate.  My father decided to come to America, make some money with my mother’s brother who already lived here in New York, then send for my mother and the two girls.  He left taking nearly two months to get to New York.  It was barely three weeks after he stepped onto Ellis Island when World War One started.  My mother and your aunts were trapped for the next three years.  For a while, my dad could get in touch with them.  He sent money, but after about a year, the lines were totally cut off.  He didn’t know where they were, if they were even alive.  As far as I know, he kept working, saving money.  My mother on the other hand, was starving.  The pogroms were continuing.  The Cossacks were riding through villages, raping women and running everything that moved through with a sword.”  He licked his lips, concentrating, clearly thinking about what it must have been like for his mother.  My hair stood on end.

“One day, my mother was in the town rather than at their farm when the Cossacks came riding in.  One grabbed my mother around the waist and lifted her onto the horse while he was moving.  He intended to rape her in the saddle and kill her.  She grabbed his pistol from out of the holster around his waist.  She shot him dead as they rode.”

My mouth was open and my eyes were far bigger than saucers.  My dad laughed at my expression.  “I know.  Totally amazing–she was an amazing woman.  She never told me that story.  Her brother told me after she died.  I remember saying to him, ‘My Mother?’  I couldn’t believe it.”

“What happened?”  I asked mesmerized.  “How did she get away with it?”

He nodded solemnly.  “I asked the same question.  She rode back to the farm.  Her brothers buried the body.  They slaughtered the horse and ate the meat—they couldn’t keep it, even though it would have been great for the farm, because it would have aroused suspicion and questions–but it was no longer safe for her or your aunts.  People had seen it happen.  They knew it wasn’t long before someone turned her in for a loaf of bread.”  He bit the inside of his cheek, just a bit; frightened for them even though he knew it turned out alright.

“So she took what she could carry, along with my sisters and started walking to America.”

“Walking?  Are you serious?”  I literally could not imagine walking thousands of miles.

“Yep.  She and my sisters hid in the woods during the day and walked at night for months.  Eventually, she joined a refugee line.”

“How long did it take?”  I couldn’t imagine.  The fear I felt hearing about it was palpable–what must it have been like to go through something like that?

“Two years.”

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Book reviewers needed? Connect with Summer Lane

 Summer Lane, Author of  Snappy Social Networking: How to Dominate the Blogosphere & Everything in Betweenwill divulge tips and tricks authors should use when writing for a blog this Saturday, June 16.

Not only do you want to check out Lane’s book on Amazon, but you definitely want to add Miss. Lane to your list of free book reviewers.

Aimed at giving independent and self-published authors a presence on the web, Lane hosts Indie Mondays on her blog, Writing Belle.

“I spend a lot time reading indie books,” Lane said in her interview. “And I think self-publishing is well on its way to becoming the way for an established author.”

Lane reviews young adult and new adult genres. For all you memoir and biography writers, you can think, ‘Finally!’ Yes, Miss. Lane is also the answer to your book reviewing needs.

Do not be afraid to connect with Lane while waiting for Saturday to roll around. Time is of the essence and Writing Belle will provide you much needed inspiration from successful self published authors in the meantime.

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Release day party for Want by Stephanie Lawton!

Forbidden fruit can be the sweetest—or the most dangerous.

Julianne counts the days until she can pack her bags and leave her old-money, tradition-bound Southern town where appearance is everything and secrecy is a way of life. A piano virtuoso, she dreams of attending a prestigious music school in Boston. Failure is not an option, so she enlists the help of New England Conservatory graduate Isaac Laroche to help her.

She can’t understand why he suddenly gave up Boston’s music scene to return to the South. He doesn’t know her life depends on escaping it. Julianne must face down madness from without, just as it threatens from within. Isaac must resist an inappropriate attraction, but an indiscretion at a Mardi Gras ball—the pinnacle event for Mobile’s elite—forces their present wants and needs to collide with sins of the past.

Will Julianne accept the help she’s offered and get everything she ever wanted, or will she self-destruct and take Isaac down with her?

Early Praise:

“A heart-rending, romantic, and compulsively readable debut. You will remember Juli and Isaac for a long time to come!” –R.A. Nelson, author of Teach Me and Throat

“A powerful masterpiece, exploring tough issues, sweet love, and high stakes…”– Aubrie Dionne, Author of “Paradise 21”

“This story opened my eyes to how exciting contemporary YA romance can be” – Lisa Voisin, Author of “The Watcher”

EXCLUSIVE BOOK BIRTHDAY DISCOUNT!

Buy the book now at Inkspell Publishing Store and enjoy a special EXCLUSIVE 30% discount! Offer valid only till 14th June!

Curious about some “behind-the-curtain” scenes? Read her short story “Aftertaste” for free!